The Coloristos ColorCast - Episode 3 "Grading Monitors"

Discussion in 'Media' started by Jason Myres, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. Jason Myres Moderator

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    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Coloristos Episode 3 is Available!

    This show we're talking about...

    • Monitors for color grading, the various display technologies available, the difference between a computer display and a reference monitor, and the factors that make a display suitable for color accurate work.

    There have been a lot of questions about displays lately, so this episode is for anyone looking into a high-quality monitor for grading. We'll be covering this topic a lot more in episodes to come, but this is an initial overview of what's available and what to look for in a grading monitor.

    To listen to this episode go to: www.Coloristos.com
    Or Subscribe on iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-coloristos-color-cast/id549040100?
  2. Esteban Aguilera Moderator

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    Madrid / Spain
    Is like a dedicated podcast to me ;)
  3. Jorge Rodriguez

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    3
    Awesome! Great podcast.
  4. micha schmidt

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    55
    Location:
    Germany
    nice episode guys! ... a really good (but not tooooooo expensive) monitor is basically the "only" think left for my edit suite ;) but all these numbers and models in that podcast .... i kinda lost track ;)

    so what are the the impotent ones u recommend ... panny / FSI ...

    PS. i use a DELL U2711 for the GUI ... that one is pretty nice but now i really only need a nice screen to connect with my BMD Decklink HD Extreme 2 to monitor 1080p25 (to replace that "old" SONY BRAVIA LCD TV ... i did like and kinda trust over the years but its by far not 100% ;)
  5. Jason Myres Moderator

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    The monitors we mentioned...

    Dolby
    PRM-4200 LCD: http://www.dolby.com/us/en/professi.../prm-4200-professional-reference-monitor.html

    Sony
    BVM-E250 OLED: http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/product-BVME250/
    PVM-2541 OLED: http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/cat-monitors/cat-oledmonitors/product-PVM2541/

    FSI
    LM-2461W LCD: http://www.flandersscientific.com/index/LM2461W
    CM-170W LCD: http://www.flandersscientific.com/index/pg91632

    JVC
    Verite DT-V24G11Z LCD: http://pro.jvc.com/prof/attributes/features.jsp?model_id=MDL102068

    Panasonic
    BT300 Pro Plasma: http://www.panasonic.com/business/plasma/th-50bt300u.asp
    VT50 Plasma (2012): http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/TC-P55VT50
    VT30 Plasma (2011): http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/TC-P55VT30
    VT25 Plasma (2010): http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/TC-P50VT25
    11UK Pro Plasma (2009): http://www.panasonicplasmas.com/TH-50PF11UK.asp

    If you don't have a few thousand dollars, you can start out with a Panasonic Plasma, and get it calibrated or run it in THX mode until you can.

    Once you do, you can look at possibly getting the Sony PVM, which has an OLED panel element that offers great black levels, but a narrower angle of view or the FSI 2461W, which uses a Wide Gamut CCFL LCD, offers wider viewing angles, and good black levels for an LCD.

    There are also a number of other units we didn't mention, but maybe some people can chime in about displays they are having a good experience with.
  6. micha schmidt

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    55
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    Germany
  7. Bart Walczak

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    145
    It's awesome podcast guys. Tons of great info.
  8. micha schmidt

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    55
    Location:
    Germany
  9. Steve Shaw

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    579
    Do not use Plasmas for critical grading - ABL kills them!!!

    We have worked with Penta to get their displays accurate for colour work, and have just started working with FSI as well.
    There is a thread on Creative Cow about the FSI displays that got us involved...

    As for plasmas - see http://www.lightillusion.com/forums/index.php?action=vthread&forum=8&topic=42
    They are just not at all suitable for accurate colour work.

    Steve

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